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huangjian123  
#1 Posted : Thursday, October 11, 2018 5:54:04 AM(UTC)
huangjian123

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The first round of the NFL draft ended with a few players still left in the green room at AT&T Stadium Dalton Schultz Color Rush Jersey , including an All-American

Heading into the second round of the draft Iowa All-America cornerback Josh Jackson, Texas offensive lineman Connor Williams and LSU running Derrius Guice remain available. All three are safe bets to be selected some time Friday, when rounds two and three are completed. It probably won't take too long.

The NFL also invited UCF's Shaquem Griffin to the draft. It was no surprise the linebacker who lost his left hand to amputation as a child did not go in round one. He is one of the draft's biggest wild cards after putting on a show at the combine. It would not be shocking if a team called Griffin on Day 2.

Six more intriguing players likely to come off the board Friday:

Mason Rudolph, QB, 6-foot-5, 235 pounds, Oklahoma State

There was some talk that Rudolph could slip into the first round and make it a record tying six quarterbacks taken. Instead, he'll look to become the first selected on Day 2. He could be a nice value. Rudolph is a big guy, with a good arm who throws a nice deep ball. The Giants own the second pick of the second round. Maybe he's the guy they can groom to take over for Eli Manning. Denver at 40 could be a possibility along with Miami (42) and New England (43).

Will Hernandez, OG, 6-2, 345, UTEP

Six offensive linemen were taken in the first round, including two centers that could play guard and a tackle that could slide inside. Nobody bit on Hernandez, a powerful run blocker with quick feet. With Cleveland and the Bears among the first to pick in the second round, Hernandez should not have to wait too long to be picked. He might be the best offensive lineman left, though Iowa center James Daniels could be in that discussion, too.

Harold Landry, OLB/DE, 6-3, 252, Boston College

Landry was one of the best pass rushers in the country as a junior, but his senior year was wrecked by injuries. He might have to learn a more traditional linebacker's role in the NFL after mostly playing as a defensive end at BC. But he is the best edge rusher left so he probably won't have wait long into second round. The Colts at 36 and 37 could use a boost to the pass rush, but will he fit their new 4-3 defense? The Giants need pass rushers, too. A similar player to watch for is LSU's Arden Key, who was being talked about as a possible top-10 pick before he had a poor and injury plagued 2017 season.

Ronald Jones II, RB Michael Pierce Jersey , 5-11, 200, Southern California

The darting, slashing runner who always seems to fall forward. Jones is similar to Guice in style but not quite as big and strong. Georgia's Nick Chubb is also still available after three running backs (Saquon Barkley, Rashaad Penny and Sony Michel) went in the first round. Jones, Guice and Chubb could all be up for consideration for Cleveland (picks 33 and 35) and Tampa Bay (38) early in the second round. All should be off the gone by the end of round two and provide good value.

Maurice Hurst, DT, 6-2, 282, Michigan

Hurst is an undersized tackle with some health concerns, but he was probably the most productive interior defensive lineman in the country last season. Scheme fit will likely be key, but defenses that need tackles who attack gaps and look to be disruptive in the backfield could find a day two steal in Hurst.

Christian Kirk, WR, 5-10, 200, Texas A&M

Only two receivers were selected in the first round (Calvin Ridley and DJ Moore). Next up could be Kirk, who also brings with him some serious skills as a kick and punt returner. He returned seven punts and kicks for touchdowns at A&M. His size might relegate him to slot receiver. If a team is looking for a bigger target, SMU's Courtland Sutton, who is 6-5, is also left.

LAS VEGAS (AP) As revenue goes it barely registers on the books. The NBA probably gets more from the contract with its frozen daiquiri vendor than it does the new deal it inked with casino giant MGM Resorts International.

With good reason. The deal announced with such fanfare Tuesday is arguably little more than a branding exercise – at least for now – and a chance to take baby steps into a sports betting partnership that would have been almost scandalous only a few years ago.

Still, the NBA is now officially all in on sports betting. Other leagues will soon, undoubtedly, follow.

And sports may never be the same again.

Forget the image of a shadowy figure in a back room somewhere taking bets over the phone. Indeed, if the bookie you’ve used to make illegal bets over the years hasn’t made plans yet to get into another profession, you might suggest that it’s time.

Things figure to change in Las Vegas, too, if not all that much. Books in this gambling city have already expanded their offerings in recent years to include the in-game betting that the NBA believes will prove the need for its official data.

But the official seal of approval apparently means something Youth JuJu Smith-Schuster Jersey , at least to MGM. So, too, might the official data the league provides at some point in the future.

And now that MGM has a deal with the NBA, surely the NFL and Major League Baseball are going to want in on the action.

Credit NBA commissioner Adam Silver for inking a deal he called ”a leap of faith on both sides.” Silver realized early on that legalized sports betting was an opportunity for the league, not something to fear.

And when his idea of an ”integrity fee” paid to the leagues out of sports betting revenue failed to gain traction in the early adopting states, Silver pivoted to find another way to get a piece of what figures to be a huge revenue stream.

He quickly found the perfect partner in MGM, which might have some ulterior motives of its own. The company wants an NBA team for its new arena on the Las Vegas Strip, and there’s no better way to curry favor with the NBA than ink a deal with the league.

According to Silver and MGM officials, the casino company is buying data. And the party line is that it’s important, despite the fact Vegas bookies have prospered for decades without any need for official league statistics.

”I know the value of data,” MGM chairman and CEO James Murren said at a New York press conference with Silver. ”To be able to have the official NBA data for sports bettors around the world is very valuable. I was willing to, and I’ve paid for that.”

The money MGM paid isn’t much in the grand scheme of things, a few million a year over three years, according to reports. But if the NBA can convince other sports betting operations to sign up it could turn into a steady chunk of extra income for the league.

Not exactly the 1 percent of gross income the NBA was seeking from states considering legalizing sports betting, but that effort was going nowhere. In signing a deal to provide unspecified data to casinos, the league gets to profit from betting without getting hands terribly soiled with the actual messiness of it.

And new money is new money.

”This is a whole new world for us,” Silver said.

It’s hard to imagine that it was just a dozen or so years ago when the NFL refused to run an ad promoting Las Vegas on the Super Bowl, using the farcical argument that any association with gambling could ruin the league.

With the Supreme Court decision in May opening the door for legalized sports betting across the country, though, all bets are off. Instead of treating sports books like threats, the leagues are looking at them to boost profits.

What they see should have been apparent years ago: Americans want to be able to place a wager or two on their favorite teams, and they don’t feel there’s anything immoral about it.

In a perfect world, the bookies would go at it alone. They wouldn’t partner with the leagues that spent years trying to destroy them.

But for MGM, at least, it’s a marriage of convenience. The casino giant is betting the NBA will help spread its brand, and maybe even pave the way for an NBA team in Las Vegas in the near future.

And that’s a bet that just might pay off.



Tim Dahlberg is a national sports columnist for The Associated Press. Write to him at tdahlberg(at)ap.org or

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